Plomin Family Bragablog

May 10, 2009

Istanbul Update 2

Filed under: Uncategorized — mplomin @ 3:20 pm
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Dispatch from Istanbul 2

When we left the airport and took a bus to the hotel, we were able to see a variety of sights.  Initially, we drove through some of the rougher neighborhoods (maybe it’s harder to sell real estate near the airport).  But pretty soon, we were on the main coastal road in Istanbul.  Traffic here is unbelievable.  There’s some degree of order, but it’s mostly organized chaos.  We have a couple of Indians on the trip and they observed that driving in Istanbul traffic is nothing close to driving in India.  I’d say it is more like Sao Paulo or New York traffic than anything else.  Like in Sao Paulo, there are only a few roads to get from one side of the city to another in Istanbul.  So, it’s the only street that everyone is taking, and it’s not a real highway.  Bicycles, motorbikes, cars, buses, heavy machinery, and semis all share the same road.  Thankfully, there are a few pedestrian overpasses to get from one side of the street to the other.

On the one side of the street, there were those 6-story buildings I mentioned earlier.  On the other, was the ocean.  Between the street and the ocean, though, there were lots of public parks.  And it seemed that under every tree there was a picnic.  No – more than a picnic, it was more like a football tailgate.  Like in the US, it’s Mother’s Day weekend here.  So perhaps there were more people than normal enjoying family time in the park, but there were many more people at the park here than you would ever expect to see at the park in the US.  Even in park-happy Chicago, rarely is every tree occupied.

The families were multi-generational, too.  So many times, I saw a mother, father, kids, and grandparents all together in the same picnic.  Often, there were a few families sharing the tree’s shade, and I assume these were aunts and uncles and cousins.  More than being a geographic crossroads between modern Europe and tradition-rich Middle East, Turkey combines modern and traditional elements in interesting ways. Multi-generational family outings is another interesting take on this Turkish crossroads.  The people here are on average wealthy enough to move out from their parents’ homes and set up shop on their own when they get married.  However, I can see that the family is a very important part of life in Turkey.

Of course, the kids were kicking around soccer balls.  But I also saw a few people throwing rugby balls, frisbees, and even someone playing volleyball.  There were fenced-in basketball courts like you see in the US parks, too.  In some of them, the basketball rims had been ripped down and the kids were playing soccer inside them instead.  I guess this fenced-in soccer uses a smaller ball and has rules similar to indoor soccer, and it’s wildly popular in places with limited outdoor space (like Japan).

Every time I think about the families and kids here, I wish Jillian, Karol, and Patrick could have come.  Jill and I are always a little nervous about the idea of taking the kids on trips, especially abroad, but I think Turkey is the kind of country that the kids would be safe in.  If they’d enjoy it is another matter altogether, but I think there’s not much risk of their being kidnapped or hurt.  The water here is questionable, but not like El Salvador.  And there’s no real chance of war (like Mexico).

Time to leave for our dinner reservation.  More to come . . .

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1 Comment »

  1. Matt, It sounds so interesting to be in Turkey. I hope you won’t get too worn out. I know Jillian will be O.K. She is a strong woman. Children have no concept of time, so to Karol your absence will be taken well. Have fun and God Speed. Nanny Shaw

    Comment by Nanny Shaw — May 10, 2009 @ 8:11 pm


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